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A&M Health Science Center President Resigns

The longtime leader of the Texas A&M Health Science Center has resigned as the school moves under the administration of the College Station campus.

Dr. Nancy Dickey announced her resignation Tuesday after 11 years as president.

"The impending merger of the TAMHSC into the university seems an appropriate time for new leadership to take the helm," Dickey said in an HSC statement. "This is an opportunity for me to return to my passion regarding health policy, health care delivery solutions, medical ethics, and professionalism – and the importance of these topics in the education of health professionals."

E.J. “Jere” Pederson, the former executive vice president and chief operating officer of The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, will serve as the interim president as the search for a new leader begins.

“I have known Jere to be a tireless and effective health care professional who understands the challenges we face in this very important transition period," said Texas A&M President R. Bowen Loftin in the same statement. "We are fortunate to have him on our team, as we build upon the TAMHSC’s foundation and work to advance Texas A&M’s unique position at the intersection of human, animal and plant health."

In August, the A&M System Board of Regents decided to look at moving the HSC under the A&M administration.

"Such a move presents an opportunity for Texas A&M to utilize its unique, statewide presence to offer Texas a new model in higher education that blends general academics and health-related institutions into one, highly effective entity capable of meeting today's major public health challenges," reads a transition page set up on the HSC website.

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The following is a press release from the Texas A&M Health Science Center

COLLEGE STATION, Oct. 9, 2012 – Dr. Nancy W. Dickey announced today she is resigning as president of the Texas A&M Health Science Center and vice chancellor for health affairs for The Texas A&M University System, effective immediately. For the past 11 years, Dr. Dickey’s leadership as president has transformed the Texas A&M Health Science Center into a major academic health center, catapulting it from $10 million per year in research to $80 million per year, growing from four to six colleges, adding three new campuses, and more than doubling the school’s enrollment from 880 to 2,100 students.

“Dr. Dickey has been a committed and forceful leader of the Texas A&M Health Science Center and we owe her a debt of gratitude,” said John Sharp, chancellor of the A&M System.

“For the last 11 years, the administration of the health-related programs of the Texas A&M System has essentially been my life,” said Dr. Dickey. “Effective today, I am resigning my current role. The impending merger of the TAMHSC into the university seems an appropriate time for new leadership to take the helm. This is an opportunity for me to return to my passion regarding health policy, health care delivery solutions, medical ethics, and professionalism – and the importance of these topics in the education of health professionals. These are exciting times for the A&M System and Texas A&M University; the move of the health-related programs into the core of the university can only enhance the climb to greater accomplishment and recognition.”

E.J. “Jere” Pederson, former executive vice president and chief operating officer of The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, will serve as acting head of TAMHSC and will be voted on as interim head at the November Board of Regents meeting. Pederson is a graduate of Trinity University in San Antonio and has been actively involved in health care administration for over 30 years.

Dr. R. Bowen Loftin, president of Texas A&M, has known Pederson for many years when they both worked in Galveston. “I have known Jere to be a tireless and effective health care professional who understands the challenges we face in this very important transition period. We are fortunate to have him on our team, as we build upon the TAMHSC’s foundation and work to advance Texas A&M’s unique position at the intersection of human, animal and plant health.”

Under Dr. Dickey’s direction, the state has benefitted from an innovative model of health professions education that has rapidly and efficiently doubled the size of the College of Medicine enrollment to 200 students per year across four campuses while producing students who regularly lead the state in licensure pass rates. Dr. Dickey also brought to fruition the Rangel College of Pharmacy, which is the first professional school to serve South Texas and is rapidly addressing the shortage of pharmacists in the region. She initiated a highly effective College of Nursing whose graduates are helping fill vacancies in hospitals across the state, and founded the Rural and Community Health Institute which is poised to dramatically improve the quality of care for Texans.


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