Apologetic Sam Houston State Student Won't Get Punished by Sam for Tweet

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SAM HOUSTON STATE UNIVERSITY - Not long after apologizing, the Sam Houston State University student whose social media comments about a deputy's killing went viral now knows she will not receive a punishment from her school.

SHSU President Dana Hoyt released a statement Saturday saying after "much time" looking at the "careless remarks" of student Monica Foy, the university will not take action against her.

"Ms. Foy has issued an apology and will have to live with the consequences of her actions," Hoyt wrote. "Our response maintains both our academic integrity and upholds the Constitution of the United States of America. Sometimes the right choice is not always the most popular decision."

Many had called on SHSU to take action after Foy took to Twitter Tuesday with this tweet: "I can't believe so many people care about a dead cop and NO ONE has thought to ask what he did to deserve it. He had creepy perv eyes..."

The post was connected to Harris County Sheriff's Deputy Darren Goforth, who was killed August 28 while pumping gas. The alleged killer is in custody. Services for Goforth were held Friday.

The day before, Foy issued a statement to the Houston Chronicle apologizing to Goforth's family and law enforcement for her comments.

"My statement and my choice of words were without the sensitivity that this tragedy calls for," Foy said. "I hope for nothing but peace and comfort for those in mourning, and cannot express how deeply I regret adding to their pain."

The tweet earned massive backlash after it found its way to the Breitbart website and went viral from there despite Foy deleting it. She received threats, and was also arrested on an outstanding warrant on an assault charge from 2011.

"To the individual officers who have showed the utmost kindness and professionalism in protecting the safety of my family and friends, who have suffered due to my actions: I thank you from the bottom of my heart for your ability to see past any bias you may hold against me and to continue to protect and serve the communities in your charge," Foy said in her statement.

Hoyt says taking action against Foy would have been "the path of least resistance," but that the Constitution and the university's code of conduct provided no path for punishment.

"A personal comment made on a private social media account, as offensive as it was, remains protected by the First Amendment," Hoyt wrote. "Offensive speech is still protected speech. As an institution that is responsible for educating generations of students in criminal justice and the order of the law, we must stand behind those teachings."

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The following is the statement released by Monica Foy to the Houston Chronicle:

"I would like to apologize profusely to every person who was offended by my words, but especially to Darren Goforth’s family and friends — whose heartbreak I cannot begin to fathom, and to the law enforcement community.

"My statement and my choice of words were without the sensitivity that this tragedy calls for. I hope for nothing but peace and comfort for those in mourning, and cannot express how deeply I regret adding to their pain.

"To the individual officers who have showed the utmost kindness and professionalism in protecting the safety of my family and friends, who have suffered due to my actions: I thank you from the bottom of my heart for your ability to see past any bias you may hold against me and to continue to protect and serve the communities in your charge.

"I have a strong belief in the value of every human life, and believe that the American justice system, when free of corruption and abuse of power, safeguards the inherent dignity and worth of every life it touches. I again thank you for leading by example."

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The following statement was issued by Sam Houston State University President Dana Hoyt:

Much time has been spent deliberating the careless remark made by one individual on Twitter this week. The comment was hurtful and the public's outrage was understandable. Ms. Foy's statement and the resulting firestorm that followed generated a lot of negative publicity aimed at Sam Houston State University and misrepresented the reputation of our students, alumni, faculty and staff.

"The path of least resistance would be to take disciplinary action against Ms. Foy. Many in the public have called for us to do so. But the legal rights conferred on every American citizen and the code of conduct that governs SHSU students says otherwise. A personal comment made on a private social media account, as offensive as it was, remains protected by the First Amendment. Offensive speech is still protected speech. As an institution that is responsible for educating generations of students in criminal justice and the order of the law, we must stand behind those teachings.

"Ms. Foy has issued an apology and will have to live with the consequences of her actions. Our response maintains both our academic integrity and upholds the Constitution of the United States of America. Sometimes the right choice is not always the most popular decision. Thank you for standing together as Bearkats and supporting the values that Sam Houston State University has honored for more than a century."