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Houston Ship Channel Reopened to Limited Traffic

By: Juan A. Lozano, Associated Press
By: Juan A. Lozano, Associated Press

GALVESTON, Texas (AP) The Coast Guard partially reopened one of the nation's busiest seaports to ship traffic Tuesday, three days after a collision between a barge and a ship spilled up to 170,000 gallons (643,500 liters) of tar-like oil into the waters south of Houston.

Authorities said ships were being allowed through the Houston Ship Channel after their assessment teams deemed it was clear enough for passage. More than 100 ships on both sides of the channel were awaiting the reopening.

"The cleanup operations progress is to the point that there is minimal danger of contamination to the commercial maritime traffic and allowing limited transit during daylight hours," said Coast Guard Capt. Brian Penoyer. "This is an important accomplishment for every person working this response."

The oil spill happened Saturday, when a barge carrying 900,000 gallons (3.4 million liters) collided with a ship, leading to the closure of one of the nation's busiest seaports. Traffic through the channel includes ships serving refineries key to American oil production.

The amount of oil spilled was much less than such major U.S. disasters as the 1989 Exxon Valdez disaster in Alaska, which dumped 11 million gallons (42 million liters) of oil into the Prince William Sound, and the Deepwater Horizon spill, which resulted in 100 million gallons (378 million liters) of oil entering the Gulf of Mexico four years ago.

Officials believe most of the oil that spilled Saturday is drifting out of the Houston Ship Channel into the Gulf of Mexico, which should limit the impact on bird habitats around Galveston Bay as well as beaches and fisheries important to tourists.

The best-case scenario is for most of the slick to remain in the Gulf for at least several days and congeal into small tar balls that wash up further south on the Texas coast, where they could be picked up and removed, said Jerry Patterson, commissioner of the Texas General Land Office, the lead state agency on the response to the spill. Crews from the General Land Office are monitoring water currents and the movement of the oil, he said.

Environmental groups said the spill occurred at an especially sensitive time and place. The channel in Texas City, about 45 miles (73 kilometers) southeast of Houston, has shorebird habitat on both sides, and tens of thousands of wintering birds are still in the area.

The channel, part of the Port of Houston, typically handles as many as 80 large ships, as well as about 300 to 400 tugboats and barges.


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