Kerry Testifies Before Panel he Chairs

By: Associated Press
By: Associated Press

WASHINGTON -- Sen. John Kerry, President Barack Obama's nominee for secretary of state, said Thursday that the United States must get its fiscal house in order to lead worldwide, as lawmakers signaled his confirmation was a foregone conclusion.

"More than ever, foreign policy is economic policy," Kerry said in prepared testimony before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

It was an odd juxtaposition. Kerry, a Democrat, has served on the committee during his entire 28 years in the Senate and has chaired the panel for the last four. On Thursday, he was to sit at the witness table, facing his colleagues and friends.

Obama chose Kerry to succeed Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, who introduced the senator.

"John is the right choice," Clinton told the panel. "He will bring a record of leadership and service that is exemplary."

Kerry, 69, is the son of a diplomat and has served as Obama's unofficial envoy, using his skills of persuasion with leaders of Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Sen. Bob Menendez, a Democrat and the incoming chairman who presided over the confirmation hearing, noted that Kerry was the first senator on the panel in a century to ascend to the Cabinet post. Sen. Bob Corker, the panel's ranking Republican, told Kerry, "you've almost lived your entire life for this moment."

In his testimony, Kerry alluded to his controversial moment before the committee some 42 years ago when the decorated Vietnam veteran testified about his opposition to the war, and famously asked, "How do you ask a man to be the last man to die for a mistake?"

"Today I can't help but recognize that the world itself then was in many ways simpler, divided as it was along bi-polar, Cold War antagonisms," Kerry said. "Today's world is more complicated than anything we have experienced - from the emergence of China, to the Arab Awakening: inextricably linked economic, health, environmental and demographic issues" as well as issues such as proliferation.

Kerry is widely expected to win overwhelming bipartisan support from his colleagues, and that notion was reinforced by the list of people who introduced him: Clinton, freshman Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a liberal who is from Kerry's home state of Massachusetts, and Republican Sen. John McCain.

McCain and Kerry are friends who have worked closely on national security issues. They are also decorated Vietnam War veterans and former presidential candidates who know the sharp sting of defeat.

The hearing is the first of three for Obama's national security nominees and the least controversial.

Former Republican Sen. Chuck Hagel, nominated for defense secretary, will face tough questions about his past statements on Israel, Iran, nuclear weapons and defense spending at his confirmation hearing next Thursday before the Senate Armed Services Committee. John Brennan, the president's choice for CIA director, will be quizzed about White House national security leaks and the use of unmanned drones at his hearing next month.

The job of the nation's top diplomat would be the realization of a dream for Kerry, whom Obama passed over in 2008 when he chose Clinton. When Joe Biden became vice president, Kerry replaced the former Delaware senator as chairman of the committee.

Obama nominated Kerry after Susan Rice, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, removed her name from consideration following criticism from Republicans over her initial comments about the attacks on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya.

Kerry, 69, is the son of a diplomat and has served as Obama's unofficial envoy, using his skills of persuasion with leaders of Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Although a rough hearing is unlikely, Kerry will be pressed about the civil war in Syria and other hot spots, foreign aid and the Keystone XL oil pipeline, about which he'll have a major say.

More than half the Senate has urged quick approval of the pipeline, increasing the pressure on Obama to move forward on the project despite concerns from environmentalists.

"We urge you to choose jobs, economic development and American energy security," wrote 53 senators, who added that the pipeline "has gone through the most exhaustive environmental scrutiny of any pipeline" in U.S. history.

The $7 billion project would carry tar sands oil from Canada to refineries along the Texas Gulf Coast.

The Obama administration has twice thwarted the 1,700-mile (2,735-kilometer) pipeline, which Calgary-based TransCanada first proposed in late 2008. The State Department delayed the project in late 2011 after environmental groups and others raised concerns about a proposed route through environmentally sensitive land in Nebraska.

The State Department said this week it does not expect to complete a review of the project before the end of March. The State Department has jurisdiction over the pipeline because it crosses a U.S. border.

In the past, Kerry has played a major role on climate change legislation and has warned of the environmental dangers.


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