Meet the man who trained Apollo astronauts to fly the spacecraft

Behind the scenes of the Apollo missions were hundreds of people, like Texas A&M's Fred Fisher, doing their part to make sure the treacherous trip to the Moon and back went safely.

Fisher, who for the last 39 years has been a part of the Texas A&M Aerospace Engineering team, sat down on First News at Four to discuss his time working for a contractor with NASA.

"It was amazing," said Fisher. "Everyone was extremely motivated and very cooperative: we had a mission that we had to finish by the end of the decade."

And as history remembers well, they did--but first, hours upon hours on the flight training simulator. That was Fisher's department.

"Our primary job was to fix the simulator so that it performed more like the real spacecraft," said Fisher. "There were many functions that had to be performed before the lunar landing, and trained for those also."

For six months before a flight, the crew would train for several hours a week on the fixed-base simulator.

How realistic was the simulator?

"Pretty close... It didn't move."

The full conversation with Fisher is in the video player above.