World-Famous Budweiser Clydesdales visit Aggieland

By  | 

COLLEGE STATION, Texas -- Everyone is invited to see the World-Famous Budweiser Clydesdales when the eight-horse ensemble and legendary red, white and gold beer wagon stop by Kyle Field from 3 – 4 p.m. on Wednesday as part of the school’s season-long 125 Years of Aggie Football celebration.

The Clydesdales will arrive and begin staging at 1 p.m. on the west side of Houston Street (adjacent to Kyle Field); once hitch staging is complete, the Clydesdales will parade north on Houston Street until turning west on Joe Routt Boulevard. The Clydesdale will stop at approximately 2:45 p.m. near the John David Crow statue at the intersection of Joe Routt and Gene Stallings Boulevard.

The Clydesdales will be available to the public for photos from 3 – 4 p.m. before heading back to the staging area for departure.

Convenient parking for the general public is available at any of Texas A&M University’s parking garages, including the University Center Garage, Cain Garage and the West Campus Garage. Please go to transport.tamu.edu for all your parking opportunities.

Did you know?

Each of the Clydesdales’ handcrafted harnesses and collars weigh approximately 130 pounds.

The Budweiser Clydesdales are given short names, such as Duke, Mark and Bud, to make it easier for the driver to give commands to the horses during a performance.

Budweiser Clydesdales’ horseshoes measure more than 20 inches from end to end and weigh about 5 pounds.

Dalmatians were known as coach dogs because they ran between the wheels of coaches or carriages and were companions to the horses. Since the 1950s, Dalmatians have traveled with the Budweiser Clydesdales hitch, perched atop the wagon proudly seated next to the driver.

The turn-of-the-century beer wagons have been meticulously restored and are kept in excellent condition. The wagons are equipped with two braking systems: a hydraulic pedal device that slows the vehicle for turns and downhill descents, and a hand-brake that locks the rear wheels when the wagon is at a halt.